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Is FaceApp secure? Clearing up confusion about the viral app

Is FaceApp secure? Clearing up confusion about the viral app

Pop stars, athletes, and millions of others posted pictures edited with the app on their own–but what are the highly publicized privacy dangers?
FaceApp can make your face look old–but does it invade your privacy as well? Pictures from the app–and concerns about cybersecurity problems–have swirled with more distortions than clarity through social media over the previous week.

The 2017 app allows users to edit pictures in order to make them look older–or younger. It was also used by several celebrities to suddenly look like senior citizens. Taking the “FaceApp challenge” is suddenly very common, as some have called posting the pictures of the app. While the app isn’t new, its rediscovery seems to be a big fad in this season.

The app seems to be endorsed by app stores. Google’s Play Store is challenging the Android app as an Editor’s Choice – with 100 million-plus downloads. Apple’s App Store demonstrates a score of 4.5 out of 5 out of 61.6 K customers, which does not reveal the number of downloads.

Faceapp
Faceapp

There’s a question about the threat to your privacy and safety, though?
The response to the issue is NO, tells Nikolaos Chrysaidos, Avast’s intelligence and safety director of mobile risk, who checked web traffic and discovered that the app does not send sensitive information back to servers from customers. “I don’t see any sign of privacy intruding in a nefarious manner,”

He said Chrysaidos. “While it’s true that the app collects information and pictures in the manner it works, there are many applications like this with that kind of danger.

“People hear and understandably worry about AI, privacy, and Russia. But taking a step back to the facts demonstrates that this is not a significant problem of cybersecurity.

This app is not very distinct from many other common applications, despite the uproar, and has been in service for two years. As reported by TechCrunch, FaceApp has described how it uses the information and what sections of the business have Russian connections. Google technicians investigated the safety of the app and autonomous scientists on cybersecurity told The New York Times that FaceApp issues are overblown.
“It’s not a malicious app, but it’s one of many applications that raises problems of privacy,” said Avast’s Chrysaidos. “This is not a matter of urgency, but it is a common one. Companies generating applications should be more transparent about their information use, and customers should also be responsible. Practicing better general cybersecurity on your mobile phone is another reminder.

FaceApp adds that it will delete many pictures within 48 hours from its servers and that many users will not log in. “Without logging in, all FaceApp characteristics are accessible and you can only log in from the settings screen. As a consequence, 99% of customers do not log in, so we do not have access to any information that could identify an individual, “stated TechCrunch. People can also use FaceApp without enabling the app to access their picture libraries by editing photographs that they take through the app.

Higher knowledge of privacy and applications by the public could help clarify safety problems before an app goes viral, said Chrysaidos. It can become very hard to see the real face of a problem when issues fly around social media and become part of a viral subject.

Consumers concerned about FaceApp can look at the larger image by checking which applications are on their devices, learning more about privacy problems, and installing Avast Mobile Security – Ultimate on their Android device.

News Desk

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